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Stefania Sigurdson Forbes

Top 5 Reasons Why Franchisees are not Using your Fancy Analytics or Dashboard Solution

By | Franchise Scorecard, Thought Leadership

In this information age, everyone talks about how you need to track everything in franchising. And you can! From click through rates (CTR) on your website to the cost per transaction, analytics are a great thing.

But even though we have the tools at our disposal and quite often even a dashboard with a summary of multiple facts of our business, we fail to really learn what they all mean. Sometimes it is hard to see the forest for the trees.

All this data is wasted.

As a franchise owner, you probably have invested both time and money into analytics and/or a dashboard solution to help your franchisees. You did this because you understand the positive impact they can have on any organization.

Done right, they can ultimately have a positive impact the bottom line.

So why aren’t your franchisees utilizing them?

There are five main reasons that may be holding your franchisees back from using data to really enhance their performance.

1.    Too Much Data

Have you ever driven by someone’s front lawn at Christmas where there are a huge amount of decorations and lights? While individually they look good, everything together is way too overwhelming.

That’s how many franchisees see their dashboards – information overload.

They don’t know where to focus. Experiencing “data overwhelm”, they choose to skip over it rather than try to make sense of it.

Take email for example. Workers spend 50% of their time just finding and reading emails. And with today’s inboxes getting overloaded with work emails and a large variety of ‘junk’ they get disorganized very quickly. In fact, 26% of all people want to delete their inbox and just start from scratch.

Just as we need to pare down the information that is received into our inbox, you need to reduce the amount of information shown on your franchisee’s dashboard.

For analytics to really be impactful, you need to narrow the data down to a few key pieces.

Choose information that they can act upon today. Think back to SMART goals:

  • Specific: it should be clear what you’re reviewing.
  • Measurable: if you can measure it, you can improve it.
  • Actionable: the scorecard should guide action; if you can’t impact it, don’t include it.
  • Relevant: if it’s not related to your objectives, it’s not important.
  • Time-specific: they should vary over time.

Narrowing the selection of analytics included on your Franchisee’s dashboard those that meet SMART requirements, can go a long way towards helping your Franchisees utilize them more frequently. They will see value in the data, not just numbers.

2.    It isn’t Actionable

How would you feel if your fitness coach said only tracked the number of pull-ups you could do?

It’s like telling your franchisee they had X number of customers last quarter. What is he supposed to take away from that? It’s not actionable.

Just as a coach needs to give his trainee advice that they can use to improve their performance, you need to do the same for your franchisees. Give them something they can focus on for the next period, otherwise the franchisees can experience “paralysis by analysis”.

One example of an actionable insight is the metric ‘discount percentage’. When benchmarked against other franchises, if yours is higher, you can take steps to decrease it.

Give your franchisees actionable data and show top weaknesses first, the first thing they need to address before moving onto something else.

Keep in mind that not all franchises are alike. If you are doing a comparison you, need to do so with an equivalent group. If some of your franchises are located in a food court and others are restaurant style, they shouldn’t be compared against each other. Try to keep comparisons fair, apples-to-apples. If it isn’t a fair comparison it will be ignored, and they may start to distrust the system.

3.    It Doesn’t Inspire Change

Everyone has a growing list of things to do, and as a business owner yours is possibly longer than most.

Because of this it’s easy to let your franchisees swim alone once they’ve had their training and are up and running. You assume that they’ll know how to use the information they get via analytics.

But they also have that ever-growing list.

And that information they want them to sift through? It just becomes another “job” on that list. Rather than helping them enhance their operations, it gets pushed aside for more pressing tasks because they don’t realize, or can’t interpret, the value it holds.

A bunch of facts and figures isn’t very inspiring to many.

To make it inspire change – keep the lines of communication open with the franchisees, and “shine the spotlight” on best practices.

  • 70% of workers said that they would work harder if their efforts were appreciated.
  • Engaged companies out-performed unengaged companies by 167%

The bottom line? Engage with your franchisees in more ways than just sharing numbers, show your appreciation of them with the entire Franchise. For example, instead of just displaying the franchises with the top sales numbers, remembering apples-to-apples, give the smaller franchises a chance to shine by also featuring the best young franchises, food court franchises etc.

4.    It’s not Timely

How many times have you heard “hindsight is 20/20”?

As a business owner you know how important it is to have up-to-date information as soon as it becomes available. You would get it yesterday if you could.

As a franchisee, getting information when it is too late is very discouraging. If their dashboard is full of old data, it does nothing for them. Even if it is ‘actionable’ if it’s outdated it won’t help them improve their business and therefore their bottom line.

This can make them feel powerless. And there is no point in communicating something when they are powerless to make change.

For a business to flourish you need the lines of communication open.

Data should be flowing both ways regularly to keep the motivation going. Give them the tools and information to make better informed decisions and the ability to see where they are at in relation to their peers.

5. They don’t Understand It

Remember Shakespeare in High School? Back then, you had time to do a deep dive into the meaning, and maybe not even then. You don’t want your Scorecard to be Shakespeare, you want it to be simple and straightforward – think of the headlines of the daily news, or even Twitter.

Complicated metrics, with multiple meanings, can cause this same confusion. Leading to debates and arguments rather than solving a problem, they have the opposite effect of what you want.

“Fuzzy” or vague interpretations can have just as negative effect. People will not take the information seriously. For example, if you have a “stated sales number” but rarely collect, the better metric can be revenue, or money in the bank.

In short, when pulling together data, remember that many Franchisees do not love numbers. Think KISS: keep it simple, stupid.

In a nutshell…

Franchising is all about relationships – and that extends to reporting. If you really want your franchisees to grow, clear and helpful analytics is a great place to start.

Proper reporting, when done right, enhances transparency and increases engagement.

But you can’t just share any numbers that sounds good. You need to deliver actionable data that your franchisees can use to improve their business. Also, keeping it true by only comparing apples to apples can help strengthen their trust. If they stop trusting it, you are not in a good place.

With Franchise Scorecards, franchisees can customize their dashboards to the information that is most relevant to them, and you can better share data that is relevant to all. Helping you all to grow together.

Keep is simple. Keep it SMART.



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Auditing Your Franchise Audit

By | Franchise Audits

Auditing your Franchise AuditLeadership author John Maxwell said:

“Good leaders ask great questions that inspire others to dream more, think more, learn more, and become more”

When it comes to your franchise audit, are you asking the right questions? After over a decade in the franchising community and working with hundreds of organizations and thousands of units, we came up with the following questions to make sure that your audit is the best that it can be – or to “audit your audit”. Outlined below, you can see sample items that we check, and what they all mean. Examples are given in many cases to enhance clarity.

The elements below shouldn’t be perceived as a complete list of potential issues but rather a simple checklist for a quick review of the health of your franchise field auditing process.

#1 Audit contains superfluous questions.

Having extra questions means unnecessary work for the auditor. In addition to obvious extra questions, you’ll find more subtle questions that are simply redundant.

Example: “Audit completed by” field then where the auditor manually enters their name when that that information is automatically added by your software tool.

#2 Some questions address multiple concerns.

A question that addresses multiple concerns makes it difficult for the franchisee to understand what needs fixing.

Example: “Walls and floors are clean and don’t feature any apparent damage and the marketing posters on the wall are recent and approved.” When faced with a failure on this question, the franchisee would not be sure what to fix.

#3 Inappropriate question type used.

Question type – such as multiple-choice or text-based or yes/no should be carefully considered when building an audit.

Example: Using a yes/no question when it comes to temperature meeting a standard instead of simply recording the temperature value itself. Another more subtle example is a yes/no question followed by a free-form text question to indicate the reason for failure, or simply a yes/no question phrased in way that asks to auditor to clarify the issue in the comments section of the question. In that case, a properly designed multiple-choice question should be considered.

#4 Some questions are not Specific, Measurable, Actionable, Relevant and Time-Bound (SMART).

The questionnaire designer should review the characteristics of each question to ensure the audits are objective and impactful. If a question is vague or addresses too many concerns, it’s unclear what is evaluated. If it’s not measurable, then the audit becomes subjective. If it’s not actionable, then even if you find a problem there’s nothing you can do to fix it. If it’s not relevant, it’s extra work that isn’t impactful. Finally, questions which aren’t time-bound are unclear as to what time period is being evaluated.

Example: Using terms such as “a reasonable amount of time” instead of simply recording how quickly the franchisee should perform the service in terms of seconds or minutes.

#5 Poor spelling or grammar.

Spelling and grammar errors can cause auditors and franchisees to lose faith in the system.

#6 The questionnaire is not structured to follow the flow of the auditor.

Matching the audit “flow”, starting outside the front door and ending with the coaching session at the back can save time and enhance the process.

#7 Documentation needs to be added to clarify the evaluation criteria for the question.

A question that refers back to standards should include a reference to the franchise manual or online standards guide.

Example: “Scheduling appropriate to sales volume” – the guideline outlining how many employees a franchisee needs for a given sales volume should be posted.

#8 Need to tag questions with the associated back-end process.

Audit scores are often represented by top-level section scores such as “Back of house: 80%” or “Cleanliness: 75%”. This is a good way to slice the information, but additional facets can be reviewed. It is a best practice to tag specific questions with the relevant process that drives that standard. When a set of standards fail and they’re all associated to the same back-end process, you can coach for the root cause rather than each standard.

Example: A standard such as “Smiling and welcoming guests” could be categorized as “Service” but a better way would be to tag it as “Training: Going above what’s required & wowing the guest”.

#9 The audit length is inadequate. 

The audit should only be as long, or as short as it needs to be in order to achieve its goals. Most long-form format audits in FranchiseBlast contain 2oo to 400 questions.

When shorter (ex: 50 questions), it could be perceived that the coach is performing a cursory visit and not going into detail. It’s normal (and desirable) to have short-form audits, but if your longest one is only 100 questions, you likely haven’t formalized your visit/coaching process.

When longer (ex: 600 questions), it could be perceived that the coach performing busywork and spending too much time filling out forms rather than coaching franchisees.  If you drill down into the data, you’ll normally notice a large cross-section of the audit never fails. These questions are candidates to be removed.

#10 Average scores are too high to drive change.

While at first it may seem like a good thing to have strong audit scores, scores that are too high will not drive change in the organization. An average score of over 90% will lead franchisees to lose motivation in terms of corrective actions as they see themselves as performing at an A+, where the franchisor’s view may be different.

Solutions to this issue are complex but include:

  • Calibrating coaches to be stricter
  • Changing the standards to be stricter
  • Shortening the audits by removing questions which always succeed
  • Changing weights of certain questions/sections/failures.
  • Adding new questions aligned with the system weaknesses you know are present but aren’t fully reflected

#11 Utilize question severity where applicable. 

There are some audit questions which are so core to the brand that they should have a “critical” marking – such as using unapproved suppliers. If questions are marked with severity, additional business rules such as “the audit should fail if any critical questions fail” can be easily put into place instead of a convoluted question weighting system.

#12 Use tasks when appropriate to define the corrective action plan.

When a weakness is recognized, it is a best practice to use a corrective action to get it followed-up on by the appropriate person. It’s typical to not start using the task system immediately when adopting a platform such as FranchiseBlast as it does require a bit of change management and expectation management with the franchisees. Once established, however, leveraging tasks can increase accountability.

Having a backlog of tasks indicates a lack of process or of training – it is a good idea to discuss expectations with the franchisees and coaches.

#13 Review processes and standards related to system-wide weaknesses.

When exploring system-wide weaknesses, sometimes there is a core process that is consistently not being followed.  To solve system-wide weaknesses it sometimes makes sense to include new practices such as recurring self-assessments.

Example: A consistent failure on exterior cleanliness may require a system-wide training or process reminder, perhaps complemented by daily self-assessments where pictures are submitted.

#14 Be a coach, not a cop. 

The franchise consultant role is evolving beyond simply being a “cop” who maintains standards. It is also a “coach” who helps the franchisee achieve their goals. The questionnaire should reflect this change.

Example: Having a “coaching” section in the audit is a fantastic first step towards creating at coaching culture.

#15 Use automatic KPI collection when possible to reduce the coach’s workload.  

We sometimes see questionnaires which include various number questions which need to be punched in by the coach. For example, what were last month’s sales, labour costs, etc. Automating this collection outside of the coaches visit, via an integration with the Point of Sale or other source system, can save the coach time plus enable them to have time to research ahead of the visit and prepare a proper action plan with the franchisee.

#16 Auditors are not well calibrated. 

When reviewing average scores among auditors, you may notice dramatically different scores. One root cause of this is an inconsistent understanding of what the standards are for each auditor.

#17 Completed audits have not been approved and/or incomplete audits are pending within the system. 

Having a backlog of pending audits could mean that completed work is not being used. Make sure to have an approval “rhythm” set up within the system and the appropriate auditor manager is aware of your expectations. Alternately, some questionnaires may benefit from being automatically approved.

#18 Not visiting all locations consistently 

Having locations “fall through the cracks” could be detrimental to the brand on many levels. Ensure that your visits are up to date as an important, but sometimes forgotten, check. We’ve often seen this in contexts where a franchisor expects each coach to visit each location quarterly but doesn’t effectively make the coaches accountable to do so.

#19 Consider adding new questionnaires.

The average franchisor in FranchiseBlast has 6 different questionnaires – is the set for your franchise complete? Sample questionnaires include:

  • Quarterly or Annual Business Plan
  • Weekly/monthly phone call business check-in
  • New store opening checklist
  • Food safety audit
  • Daily store logs self-assessments (openings/closings)
  • New marketing rollout assessment
  • New product readiness self-assessment

Conclusion

The “audit of the audit” is a fantastic way to assess your operations, and to ensure that you are using these audits to reach organizational goals. If you are ready to have one of our consultants look at your audit, click here and indicate that you would like to discuss auditing the audit.



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CFA: 5 Ways to Boost the Impact of your Franchise Field Audits

By | News

Canadian Franchise Association Logo

We were so pleased to be featured by the Canadian Franchise Association for our 5 Ways to Boost the Impact of your Franchise Field Audits. Here is an excerpt from the article.

When done the right way, field audits can foster franchisee development while highlighting needed business improvement areas

A franchise audit can sometimes seem like a hostile action. Franchisees might ask of field audits, “Why is head office policing the way I do business? Are they looking to find something wrong with my methods?” These are natural questions to ask – especially with the stress of running a business looming over a franchisee’s head. This mentality creates the picture of a franchisor being a cop, rather than coach, and represents the old way of performing audits. But field audits are far from hostile – in fact, they exist to empower franchisees and foster best practices within individual franchise units…

Read the full article here… 

 

 

IFA: 8 Tech Tips To Keep Your Franchise Hip

By | News, Thought Leadership

international franchise associationOriginally published in Franchise.org, FranchiseBlast recently shared with the community about 8 Tech Tips to Keep Your Franchise Hip.

The pace of change in the franchise space is picking up quickly. While experienced franchisors may dismiss these as passing fads they do so at their own risk as new entrants seize the market opportunity. Here are some keys to taking a forward-thinking view:

Pay Attention – New developments in tech are cropping up all the time. Keeping your staff aware and trained in the benefits of technology will help you adapt quickly.

“Keeping your staff aware and trained in the benefits of technology will help you adapt quickly.”

Embrace Technology – If you’re still not fully engaged with technology, you’re not getting the most out of your staff, or your franchisees.

Challenge Norms – Following trends doesn’t mean following the crowd. Don’t be scared to put your own twist on things. Remember, what works for one franchisor, might not work for you.

Read full article here… 

Tommy Gun’s Original Barbershop Improves Old-Fashioned Luxuries with New Technology

By | Press Release, Spa and Salon

For Immediate Release: PRWeb

November 1st, 2018, Toronto: Sometimes a haircut is more than just a haircut — it’s an experience – one that will now be bolstered by technology. Tommy Gun’s, a family-owned upscale chain of barber shops offering a 1930s aesthetic is employing mobile-friendly technology with human-centered workflows to further enhance their business model.

Supported by FranchiseBlast’s Performance Tools, Tommy Gun’s is enhancing its ability to track the metrics of success that each location relies on to thrive. FranchiseBlast, an Ottawa-based technology firm, provides a comprehensive suite of tools for franchises looking to streamline their field coaching processes. With this in their arsenal, the franchisor not only ensures operational compliance but also coaches franchisees to improve their performance.

The solution also allows Tommy Gun’s to aggregate data from Voice of the Customer tool, Listen360, Google Reviews and their point of sale into one convenient location for easy analysis. By incorporating these tools, Tommy Gun’s is looking for point-and-shoot efficiency on the business side, so they can spend even more time on their legendary customer service.

“We pride ourselves on providing a uniquely high level of customer service,” says Darcy Curtis, Director of Barbershop Operations at Tommy Gun’s. “By making the business management side easier and quicker, we can focus on the thing that matters most — giving our customers an exceptional barbershop experience!”

Through the aggregation of data, franchisee coaches are spared the lengthy and monotonous task of copy and pasting data into folders. FranchiseBlast’s Performance Tools saves them time so they can spend more time connecting with individual franchisees.

“A franchisee coach’s time is much better spent actually talking to people, rather than punching in numbers and copy and pasting,” Jason Kealey, President of FranchiseBlast, said. “Our tools make these processes more efficient, so coaches can get back to doing what they do best. Additionally, franchisees gain access to benchmarked data, guiding them on improving their individual weaknesses compared to the franchise as a group.”

About Tommy Gun’s

Tommy Gun’s Original Barbershop is Canada’s largest family-owned network of barbershops, blending 1930’s vintage barbershop grooming with modern amenities, men’s unique grooming products and the latest styles. Our 60+ locations across Canada provide guests with the epitome of male grooming. At Tommy Gun’s, our mission is to ensure that every guy who visits walks away feeling and looking his best.

About FranchiseBlast

Since 2007 FranchiseBlast has helped franchises in their quest for operational excellence. Integrating best practices from some of the world’s best-known brands, FranchiseBlast combines elegant usability with turn-key quickstart programs. FranchiseBlast’s clients include brand aggregators such as Focus Brands and individual franchise brands such as BeaverTails, Pita Pit and Tropical Smoothie Café among many others.

Contact:

Stefania Sigurdson Forbes
Sr. Marketing Director
FranchiseBlast
877-567-5282 x709
ssigurdsonforbes@franchiseblast.com

See PRWeb Submission

Global Franchise: 5 Minutes With Jason Kealey

By | Meet the Team, News

Global Franchise Header

We are so pleased to be featured in this month’s edition of Global Franchise. The article featured 5 Minutes with Jason Kealey. In the article, Jason discusses what he likes about franchising, his biggest challenges and how he unwinds. Here is an excerpt:

What affords you most satisfaction about your work?

I am passionate about making franchise operations the best that they can be. I think this is the best model in the world and there’s so much potential. I also love the people in franchising – this is a space that is all about relationships, and I am happy to have so many long-time friends in the community.

What aspect of your work offers the greatest challenges?

I think the most challenging portion of our work is that improving unit-level economics is such a diverse and multi-faceted challenge. There are endless paths our software could pursue and determining the most impactful paths we should address is a great challenge.

Read the whole article here.

Franchise Marketing Coach Dos and Donts

By | Franchise Coaching, Marketing

dos and donts franchise marketing coachMarketing coaching can be one of the hardest parts of franchising.

Why?

Getting leads, and customers in the door, is truly a matter of life and death for franchisees.

And while there are some things in Marketing that ARE black and white, there are others that are more shades of grey than anything else.

So – lets delve into the world of Franchise Marketing for coaches – we will look at what is black and white, and what is in that messy grey space in between.

Dos

Understand Differences

One of the difficult truths in Franchise Marketing is that… things that work in some communities do not work in others.

It’s frustrating, but true.

Ask any pro marketer, who has accounts running across different areas.

While something like food safety rules is universal  – Pay Per Click spend is higher in larger centers where there is more competition. In other areas, people rely strictly on word-of-mouth. In still others, trust of strangers is very low, so events are not as strong.

What makes it extra-tough, is that sometimes franchisees will say something that stretches them outside of their safety zones does not work.

So – you actually do want to dig deep and understand the differences.

AND – you want to have a Marketing Plan that embraces these differences by having one that diversifys the franchisees options.

Focus on Numbers

There are not many people that got into franchising because they LOVE numbers, or at least I have never met one.

Most franchisors are now embracing SMART goals when it comes to Marketing. It is a great start.

But, focusing on numbers does only come in the planning phase, it is measuring results.

We have seen this as one of the top Marketing failures in our clients. Measuring what works, and what does not, is a great indicator to send back to the Marketing team. Remember, Marketing is changing quickly, and there is no way to react if the activity is not being measured.

Embrace Community

While connecting to the community is something we often teach in training, it is one of the first things that fall to the side when things get busy.

A business, any business, is about relationships. And – that competitive advantage can be achieved by being yourself out in the community. The brand of “you” is more powerful than any bid on an online ad.

So – it is great to have a “connect with the community” side of your audits when it comes to Marketing. These humble activities can make a big difference.

Donts

 

Take Things at Face Value

The book Getting to Yes discusses the idea of having a “Position” and then an “Interest”. According to a Harvard blog on this subject:

We tend to begin our negotiation by stating our positions. A homeowner might say to a developer, for instance, “I won’t allow you to develop this property.” When we stake out firm positions, we set ourselves up for impasse. In our goal of getting to yes, we need to draw out the interests underlying our counterpart’s positions by asking questions, such as, “Why is this property important to you?” By identifying what interests are motivating the other party, and sharing your own interests, you can open up opportunities to explore tradeoffs across issues and increase your odds of getting to yes.

In a nutshell, the franchisees may come to you with a problem – which is a position. For example, a problem of not enough leads could mean a few things:

  • Not closing enough leads.
  • Qualifying too aggressively, leaving good leads on the table.
  • Not enough referrals and upsells from current clients.

As a coach, you are not denying the reality of the problem, but you are digging deeper into the true source, rather than just solving the “Position”.

Ignore Creativity

When you are on-site with a franchisee, with your checklist, it is easy to get into the mindset of “different is bad”.

And, we do all have brand standards for a reason.

But, the best leaders will put the majority of their focus on the here and now, they do also look at what is next. Listening and learning about a new idea or innovation may not be something you can do today, but it could be rolled into plans for the future.

There is a sweet spot there.

It is not chaotically moving from idea to idea, anhialating the brand.

It is listening and looping in the ideas.

Conclusion

Like everything in Franchising, Marketing Coaching is a balancing act. Getting the balance right can make a transformative difference to your franchisees. The Marketing world comprises black, white, the grey in between along with all of the other colors.



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3 Franchise Coach Superheroes… and How to Overcome their Related Weaknesses

By | Franchise Coaching

Franchise coach superheroes cannot fly without an airplane (and some can be found there very often), and they won’t be found wearing capes or spandex (other than on Halloween). But every franchise coach needs to have superpowers to help their franchisees and to drive performance. Here are 3 Franchise Coach Superpowers and how you can overcome their related weaknesses.

1. Captain Intuition

This coach is very intuitive, and has a natural sense about what the franchisees need. Almost always coming from a sales or service background, he has a high EQ, and is typically very popular among franchisees.

Related Weakness: Captain Intuition may be so good spontaneously or “on the spot”, that he may lack discipline in the planning department. Providing this coach with planning tools with intuitive workflows is a must.

2. Cat-Tastrophe

This super-hero is the lady to go to when a franchisee is in trouble. She is always cool under pressure, and knows exactly what to say to have her franchisees go from chaos to confidence. Highly resourceful, this coach uses all tools at her disposal to get franchisees where they need to go , whether it be head office resources… and beyond.

Related Weakness: The “dark side” of resourcefulness is a coach who may struggle to follow procedures. Arming her with powerful audit tools can ensure she stays consistent with the brand.

3. Doctor Do-Right

This coach is the “go to” person when it comes to procedure and important details on legislative concerns such as food safety or compliance with other state or provincial standards. His secret weapon is his electronic checklist, and he has a sharp eye for detail – solving problems before they start.

Related Weakness: Rule-following, when taken to its extreme becomes rigidity. This coach may be challenged to “think outside the box”. Getting this coach inspired by best practices of others, or better yet, baking them into project management tools can be a great way to help.

The Coach Dream Team

Do you recognize any of these heroes? The good news about working as a team, is that everyone can balance out each others strengths, and related weaknesses.



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Recipe (Formerly CARA Operations) Locks in Restaurant Leadership with Technology

By | News, Press Release, Restaurants

For Immediate Release: BusinessWire

Quality is king in 2018 and Recipe Unlimited (formerly CARA Operations) continues to make meaningful investments in technology to strengthen its top spot in the Canadian marketplace. While Recipe’s brands such as Swiss Chalet and Harvey’s are leading the Canadian restaurant scene, to maintain that competitive edge technology is key.

FranchiseBlast’s Brand Consistency solution was selected by Recipe to help them reinforce their #1 position as Canada’s largest full-service restaurant company. Recipe both franchises and operates restaurant brands including Harvey’s, Swiss Chalet, Kelsey’s, East Side Mario’s, Montana’s, Milestones, Prime Pubs, Casey’s, Bier Markt, and Landing restaurants.

The Gatineau-based technology firm helps franchisors create consistent operations on their audits, where a coach runs a high-tech checklist of compliance items such as food safety, quality, service and more. It offers immediate, actionable insights for both franchisors and franchisees, and even creates leaderboards so brands can celebrate their operational superstars.

“I see a quiet but meaningful revolution taking place in the restaurant industry.” says Jason Kealey, President of FranchiseBlast. “Good is no longer sufficient. Operational excellence is key to winning and retaining today’s customer; even leading restaurant brands are looking for that competitive edge with brand consistency – that is what our software is all about.”

The versatility of FranchiseBlast’s solution has helped it find success in the restaurant industry. Working with Canada’s iconic restaurant brand aggregator strengthens their position globally.

“Franchising is undergoing a major transformation right now,” said Kealey. “Franchisors are focusing on unit-level economics, both top and bottom line, to help units grow.”

About FranchiseBlast

Since 2007 FranchiseBlast has helped franchises in their quest for operational excellence. Integrating best practices from some of the world’s best-known brands, FranchiseBlast combines elegant usability with turn-key quickstart programs. FranchiseBlast’s clients include brand aggregators such as Focus Brands and individual franchise brands such as Pita Pit and Tropical Smoothie Café among many others.

Contact:

Stefania Sigurdson Forbes
Sr. Marketing Director
FranchiseBlast
877-567-5282 x709
ssigurdsonforbes@franchiseblast.com

See BusinessWire Submission